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Posts Tagged ‘“All My Children”’

Best known as “Jan Brady” from “The Brady Bunch,” Eve Plumb has had quite a career! Prior to getting cast in “The Brady Bunch,” Eve appeared in such television shows as “The Big Valley,” “It Takes A Theif,” and “Family Affair.” After “The Brady Bunch” ended, Eve finished high school and continued to act in such made-for-tv-movies as “Dawn: Portrait of a Teenage Runaway,” “Alexander: The Other Side of Dawn,” and “Little Women” and a host of others TV movies and appearances. As time went by, the popularity of “The Brady Bunch” continued on and several TV movies and series were created including “The Brady Girls Get Married,” “The Brady Brides,” “A Very Brady Christmas,” and “The Bradys.” Eve’s more recent TV appearances include appearing as the mother in the TV movie “Fudge” (based upon the Judy Blume books) which later became a series of the same name and a three-episode arc on “All My Children” as well as an episode of “Days of Our Lives.”

Eve has also studied improv acting at The Groundlings School in Los Angeles where she has appeared in many smaller theater productions of comedy plays, improv, and summer stock productions including “South Pacific.” In 2010, Eve appeared with Florence Henderson (her TV mom from “The Brady Bunch) in “Broadway Backwards 5” at Lincoln Center.

In addition to acting, Eve is an accomplished fine art painter and is currently represented in galleries across the US, often appearing at opening celebrations. She is also a spokesperson for Fredrix Canvas and donates many of her artwork to such charities as Wildhorse Ranch Rescue in Arizona, Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS, and the Laguna College of Art and Design. For more on Eve’s art be sure to visit http://www.eveplumb.tv.

Currently, Eve is starring in the hit Off-Broadway show “Miss Abigail’s Guide to Dating, Mating, and Marriage” along with Manuel Herrera, written by Ken Davenport and Sarah Saltzberg at Sofia’s Downstairs Theatre (221 West 46th Street, between Broadway & 8th Avenue). For tickets to this hilariously fun show, click here!

1. Who or what inspired you to become a performer? I became a performer by accident- a children’s agent moved in next door to us when I was 6. Sent me on an audition, I got the job, and haven’t stopped working since.

2. Who is the one person you haven’t worked with that you would like to? Bette Davis. But she’s dead, so I guess that’ll never happen now.

3. Who is the most interesting person you’ve worked with? Leslie Nielsen. Very funny in real life!

4. What do you get from performing on stage that you don’t get from performing in television? Sore feet. I’m not used to wearing heels, as I do in Miss Abigail, and by the 3rd show on Saturday, I’m ready to sit down!

5. What drew you to the role of “Miss Abigail?” My agent. I was lucky enough to audition and get cast in the role, which is so much fun to do- couldn’t have made it up if I tried!

6. What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? “Show up, pay attention, tell the truth.”

7. Favorite way to spend your day off? A mix of getting errands done and lying around watching Turner Classic Movies.

8. Favorite skin care product? Bio Oil. Good moisturizer.

9. Favorite website? Pandora. Learned about a lot of other musicians from their “Genome.”

10. Superman or Wonder Woman? Wonder Woman. Cool plane.

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I had the privilege of sitting down with Chip Zien on October 16, 2010 after seeing his show “The History of War” in NYMF, which also starred fellow “Adaumbelle’s Quest” participant Max Von Essen. My first introduction to Chip was watching him on “All My Children” when he played gossip reporter “Donald Steele,” and from that moment on I was hooked. I then got to meet Chip after seeing him in the Broadway production of “The Boys From Syracuse” in 2002. He was so nice and now to have the opportunity to sit down with him personally for an interview with “Adaumbelle’s Quest” is a real honor!

Chip Zien is an award winning actor who has delighted audiences worldwide in theatre, film, and television! Chip created the roles “The Baker” in Stephen Sondheim/James Lapine’s “Into The Woods” as well as the role of “Mendel” in William Finn’s “Falsettos.” His many other Broadway credits include “In Trousers,” “March of the Falsettos,” “Falsettoland,” “The Country Girl,” the revival of “Les Miserables,” “Grand Hotel,” “The Boys From Syracuse,” “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang,” “All Over Town,” and “The Suicide.” Off-Broadway and regionally, Chip has entertained audiences in “Merrily We Roll Along” (L.A. Drama-Logue Award), “Anonymous,” “An Imaginary Life,” “Isn’t It Romantic” (Drama Desk Nomination), “Split,” “Moonchildren,” “Hot L Baltimore,” “Kaddish,” “A New Brain” (Drama Desk Nomination), “Diamonds,” “Real Life Funnies,” and “Tuscaloosa’s Calling Me.”

Chip has also written several shows for the stage. His one-man show “Death in Ashtabula,” “Travels With My Discontent” (a new musical written with Deborah Abramson, et al), and most recently “The History of War” which was presented at NYMF this past fall.

When not on stage or sometimes at the same time, Chip has been a fixture on television. In addition to being the announcer on “The Caroline Rhea Show,” Chip has appeared in numerous television shows such as “Lipstick Jungle,” “Rescue Me,” “CSI,” “Law and Order,” “Cheers,” “The Bob Newhart Show,” “Thirty-Something,” “Judging Amy,” “Cosby,” “The Cagney and Lacey Movies,” “Chips”, “Son of the Beach,” “Madigan Men,” “Wings,” “All My Children,” “Almost Perfect,” “Now and Again,” “Deadline,” “Shell Game,” “Love, Sidney,” “Reggie.”

Chip has also lit up the big screen in “The Siege,” “Howard The Duck” (the voice of Howard), “United 93,” “Snake Eyes,” “Breakfast of Champions,” “Dorothy Parker and the Vicious Circle,” “Grace Quigley,” “So Fine,” “Hello Again,” “House of God,” “and “The Rose.”

Currently, Chip is reworking “The History of War” for future production. Stay tuned to “Adaumbelle’s Quest” to find out when that will be!

1. Who inspired you to become a performer? Dean Martin, Frank Sinatra, and Perry Como. I always thought I’d grow up to be like Frank Sinatra, I thought Dean Martin was the greatest actor I’d ever seen, and I wanted to host a variety show like Perry Como. When I first came to NY, it was really my goal to just sing and host a variety show. Danny Kaye was a big influence on me as well…his songs were the first ones I really learned.

2. Who’s the one person you haven’t worked with that you would like to? Geoffrey Rush. I would have liked to work with Sinatra. You know early on in my career, I was very friendly with Henry Winkler and I was very jealous of Henry because he got to meet Sinatra and I never did. Of course, I would have also loved to work with Jack Lemon and Walter Matthau. I’ve said “Hi” to Angela Lansbury, but never worked with her, though I would love to. I’d like to work with all these wonderful actors in my show (“The History Of War”).

3. If you couldn’t be doing what you are doing now, what career would you choose? I was motoring down two paths when I graduated college…one was to be a lawyer and one was performing. I grew up in Milwaukee and as much as you could have a stage mother in Milwaukee, mine was one. She would enter me in these tiny tot talent shows and I would always sing in them. I’d sing “Down Yonder Someone Beckons To Me” and be dressed up like a cowboy with six shooters and a cowboy hat and at the end of the song I would pull my guns out and shoot off caps. So, I was always singing and be in shows, but performing seemed like an odd thing to do as a profession. A lot of my family were lawyers, so my real plan was to go to college, be a history major, go to law school and then be a lawyer or work on a political campaign. I actually ran a guy’s campaign my first year out of college and he lost by 1/2 a percentage point and if he had won, I would have gone to Georgetown Law School at night and work on his staff during the day and then my life would have changed. The reason I ended up acting, not only because I had been doing it my whole life through college, but because my step-sister was running a theatre in Chicago and somebody got sick, this was right after that campaign ended and I had to wait until January to start law school, so my sister said why don’t you come down here and you could play “Little Chap” in “Stop The World.” We are doing these three shows in this repertory theater and after a few months there the theatre burned to the ground, so a bunch of us got in a car and drove to New York and I got work right away in “You’re A Good Man Charlie Brown.” The rest as they say is history.

4. What’s your most embarrassing on-stage moment? I’ve had a few…but one of the worst was when I was doing “Grand Hotel” and I took over for Michael Jeter, who was fantastic. My wife was a dancer in the NYC Ballet and now she teaches at the School of American Ballet and she said to me, you know when you kick your leg up to do those big fan kicks, you’re leg is just not going anywhere. She said what really makes it terrible is that you keep looking at it. So don’t look at your leg, look up instead. I was determined to be a better dancer, so when I went on stage that night I looked up and fell backwards on my head (like doing a back flip) and everyone on stage just gasped. The first thought I had was I hope that I’m still standing, and that everyone else had fallen and turned upside down, so I was momentarily convinced that I was okay and the rest of the cast had fallen. Eventually the cast was hysterical laughing and dancing around me. Another time in “Into The Woods,” the fog machines wouldn’t turn off. The stage became so filled up that we couldn’t see anything and we all had to grope our ways out of the stage door onto 45th Street. We stood on the street hysterically laughing. The orchestra was stuck in the pit, the actors are out on the street, and the audience was trying to get out. Oh that night was a complete disaster. I’ve had a bunch of them…

5. What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? It was actually from James Lapine who said to me: “Stay focused on what you are doing. Just do your job. Don’t project too far ahead. Try not worry.” It’s the old cliche of “Staying in the moment.” My mom told me years ago when I was at camp, which I think she heard someone had said to James Cagney (I played all the great female roles in summer camp shows, I was “Lola” in “Damn Yankees,” I was “Liza Doolittle” in “My Fair Lady”), “You know you’re wandering all over the place. Stand still until you have a reason to move.” Wynn Handman, a great acting teacher in New York once said to me “Go to LA and make lots of money, then come back here and I’ll fix you.”

6. What’s your proudest moment? The birth of my children is probably the most amazing thing that’s ever happened to me. I also have to say driving by the Martin-Beck Theatre (now the Hirschfeld) when the big boot from “Into The Woods” went up on the marquee. I stood on the corner with Joanna Gleason and I never thought this would happen to me. We stood there together and thought “Wow, this was awesome.” It was this realization that something I wanted to do my whole life had happened and it happened at a very high level which I probably would have never imagined. One of the really cool things was when we taped that show for “Great Performances,” I had a moment with Sondheim after it was over, and we had a really great audience that night. It was one of those audiences who knew every line in the show and Sondheim said to me, “This is as good as it can get” and I just started to cry.

7. Do you have any strange or unusual talent that nobody knows about? Not really, but I think the one thing that is different is that I build my own computers. I’m technically pretty sophisticated. I was president of my high school AV squad and I mean old school when you had to thread the 16mm film. As the years have gone by, I was thinking, the things that interested me when I was 12 are the same things that interest me today. I’m also really good at Photoshop…I think it’s the 8th wonder of the world. It’s amazing what you can do. I’m also an excellent Yo-Yoist. I can do really complicated Yo-Yo tricks and that is because there was a Yo-Yo champion in “Grand Hotel” who used to practice back stage.

8. Favorite play/musical? My favorite musical is “Sweeney Todd.” My favorite play I’m stumped on, but I would have to say “Death of a Salesman.” I would love to do that show. I’m old enough to do it. I know they are doing it again, but it’s not with me. Me: Well that’s a mistake. Chip: I also love “Waiting for Godot.” The army scenes in this show are kind of modeled after “Waiting for Godot” at least in my head.

9. Favorite website? I’m a political junkie. I would say The Huffington Post, Talking Points Memo, and I sneak onto some of the theatrical websites.

10. Mary or Rhoda? Mary.

BONUS QUESTIONS:

11. If you could dream about anyone while you sleep, who would it be? I used to have a recurring dream where I would drink coffee around a camp fire with John Wayne and he would say “Kid, it’s gonna be okay.” Then that dream mutated to Jack Gilford as I got older. It’s kind of really funny because they are opposite ends of the spectrum. I crossed paths with John Wayne at one moment in my career because at one point we had the same agent, obviously it was late in his career and early in mine, and I was sitting in a lobby across from John Wayne and I thought to myself “Wow, this is really the yin and yang of show business right here.” I said, “Hi” and he said, “Hi, how are you doing kid?”

I would also love to dream about having dinner with Bill and Hillary or President Obama. I liked to dream about being at some of those big meetings they have, like health care. Those dreams can be exciting because you can’t be at them in real life.

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This contest is now over and today’s winners are Miriam and Martha! Congratulations Martha and Miriam! Be sure to tune in next week for another edition of “Win It Wednesday” because you never know, the winner just might be you! It’s another edition of “Win It Wednesday” here on “Adaumbelle’s Quest” and two lucky readers, at random, will have the chance to win a brand-new, unopened “Invitation” Body Lotion by daytime Diva, Broadway and Cabaret star Susan Lucci. This floral scented body lotion is the perfect way to have sexy looking skin, while staying moisturized during these upcoming cold months. Just answer the question below and one of these could be yours! The winners will be announced at 5pm! Good Luck!

If you could cast Susan Lucci in any Broadway show, what show would you cast her in?

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If you are looking for a performer with strong vocals, good looks, and most of all talent, then Curtis Holbrook is your guy! A performer on the definite rise, Curtis has delighted Broadway audiences in “Xanadu,” “Follies,” “All Shook Up,” “The Boy From Oz,” “Taboo,” “Fosse,” and “Footloose,” and the current Broadway revival of “West Side Story.”  His Off-Broadway credits include “Saved!” at Playwrights Horizon and “Radiant Baby” at the Public Theater. Curtis has also lit up the screen in such films and television shows as “Hairspray,” “Across the Universe,” “Law and Order: SVU,” “Sesame Street,” “All My Children,” and “As The World Turns.” Curtis can currently be seen in “Frog Kiss” (along with fellow “Adaumbelle’s Quest” participant Kate Pazakis) produced by Brierpatch Productions as part of the NYMF festival from September 30-October 11 at the Theater at St. Clements (423 West 46th Street).

1. Who inspired you to become a performer? First, I would have to say my mother…Because she put in me in tap class at the age of 2 🙂 But when I was old enough to know what being inspired was, I saw Gene Kelly and Donald O’Connor in Singin’ in the Rain. That moment was truly magical for me. I was hooked.

2. What is the highest and lowest note you can sing? I don’t actually read sheet music…I do everything by ear. I try not to think about what notes I am singing because it can mess with your head, ya know?…But I think when we filmed Across the Universe I sang a high D.

3. Who is the one person you haven’t worked with that you would like to? Just one? There are so many!!! Well even though it isn’t possible…Bob Fosse. His way of storytelling is like no other.

4. If you couldn’t be doing what you are doing now, what career would you choose? Marine Biology.

5. Do you have any rituals that you must do before a show? Depends on the show… Usually, I listen to music that could be the soundtrack of the characters life… That helps to get me focused and fired up. How do you decompress after a show? An adult beverage.

6. Do you have any strange or unusual talent that nobody knows about? Hand Farting.

7. Favorite ride at an amusement park? All of them! The X Factor @ Magic Mountain might be my favorite though.

8. Favorite way to stay in shape? Really just by doing what I do…and Yoga. I don’t do gyms.

9. Boxers or Briefs? Really??? If you must know…square cut boxer briefs. So both!

10. Favorite website? YouTube.

11. Superman or Wonder Woman? Batman.

BONUS QUESTIONS:

12. What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? My Grandfather always told me…”Think For Yourself.”

13. If you could dream about anyone while you sleep, who would it be? My wife 🙂

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On Monday, May 10, 2010, I had the honor of sitting down with the multi-talented, award winning Christian Campbell. From television to film to theatre, Christian is known in every medium. His theatre credits include “Drift,” “Tick, Tick…Boom,” “Juno and the Paycock,” “Nagasaki Dust,” “A Clockwork Orange” and originating the role of “Jimmy” in the LA & New York runs of “Refer Madness,” which garnered him a Best Actor Award from the Drama Critics Circle. In film, Christian has delighted audiences in “Trick,” “Refer Madness: The Movie,” “East Street Bliss,” “Casino Jack,” “Neighbor,” “The Betrayal,” “IBID,” “One Night,” “Pretty Dead Girl,” “Thank You Good Night,”  “The Piano Man’s Daughter,” “Next Time,” and “City Boy.” Television audiences have seen Christian in such hit shows as “All My Children,” “CSI Miami,” “Ghost Whisperer,” “NCIS,” “CSI: NY,” “The Verdict,” “The Book of Daniel,” “The $treet,” “Max Steel,” “I’ve Been Waiting For You,” “Seduced by Madness,” “7th Heaven,” “Malibu Shores,” and “Degrassi High.” Chrisitian can currently be seen in The Active Theater’s production of “Magnetic North” through May 16 at The Workshop Theater in New York City (312 West 36th Street). For tickets, click here!

1. Who inspired you to become a performer? I would say my parents. Both of them are actors, it’s a family business.

2. Who is the one person you haven’t worked with that you would like to? Ridley Scott. I’m a big fan of his work.

3. If you could dream about anyone while you sleep, who would it be? My wife.

4. What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? Expect the unexpected. That’s been my life pretty much.

5. Starbucks or Dunkin’ Donuts? What do you order? Dunkin’ Donuts. I order the vanilla coffee.

6. Favorite kind of sundae (ice cream flavor and toppings)? Recovering from Saturday.

7. Favorite way to stay in shape? Running.

8. Boxers or Briefs? Boxer-Briefs. I’m a middle man, what I can I say.

9. Favorite website? NYTimes.com

10. “Gobots” or “Transformers”? Definitely Transformers..Barnum, Mirage…my favorite.

BONUS QUESTIONS:

11. What is the highest and lowest note you can sing? I don’t know. It depends on how much I partied on Saturday night. Seriously, I’m a baritenor.

12. Do you have any strange or unusual talent that no one knows about? I can remember weird and odd facts.

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Nominated for a 2010 Tony Award for Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Musical for his role in the Broadway revival of “Ragtime,” Bobby Steggert is another next generation performer whose star is shining brightly! He has also starred in the Broadway productions of “110 in the Shade” (for which he received a Outer Critics Circle nomination) and “‘Master Harold’…and the boys.” Bobby just completed a triumphant run in the York Theatre’s production of “Yank: A World War II Love Story” (along with fellow “Adaumbelle’s Quest” participant Nancy Anderson). Other Off-Broadway credits include his Drama Desk nominated performance in “The Slug Bearers of Kayrol Island” at the Vineyard Theatre, “columbinus” at NYTW, and the New Group’s production of “The Music Teacher.” Bobby has also performed with the NY Philharmonic in “Camelot” and “Sondheim: The Birthday Concert” both filmed for PBS. In addition to theatre, Bobby has lit up the screen in film and television including “All My Children” (Sam Grey), “The Namesake,” “Game Six,” “Night Swimming,” and “Kinsey.” Keep your eyes peeled because Bobby’s gearing up for his next endeavor…until that’s announced, be sure to follow him on Twitter!

1. Who inspired you to become a performer? My parents, who admittedly have zero artistic talent, were ultimately my inspiration, because they instilled in me the true belief that I was capable of succeeding at what I loved. They had nothing but trust in my potential, and in my dedication to theater, and I carry that confidence with me wherever I go.

2. What is the highest and lowest note you can sing? I have no low notes..probably a B on a good day, or when I’m sick.  But I can get up there – B flat in full voice, much higher in falsetto.

3. Who is the one person you haven’t worked with that you would like to? Denis O’Hare and Brian D’Arcy James. I couldn’t choose.

4. What is your proudest moment? The first preview of 110 in the Shade. I simply couldn’t believe my dreams had come true in such a vivid and exciting way.

5. Do you have any strange or unusual talent that no one knows about? I’m a surprisingly good bowler. My friends in college named me Turkey Bob because I would consistently get Turkeys (3 strikes in a row) when we’d play.

6. Favorite way to stay in shape? I’m pretty lax about that. But if I’m thinking about it, it’s more about avoiding really crappy food.

7. Boxers or Briefs? Boxer-briefs always.

8. Favorite play/musical? Caroline, or Change and Streetcar Named Desire.

9. Favorite website? www.overheardinnewyork.com – hilarious.  And my best friend loves reading missed connections on Craigslist which I think is really fascinating as well.

10. Superman or Wonder Woman? I am not a comic book kind of guy. So I’d say neither. But Superman if you held me at gunpoint.

BONUS QUESTIONS:

11. Favorite TV show? “Mad Men.”

12. Favorite quote? Appropriate during Sondheim Appreciation Month……”Anything you do, let it come from you, then it will be new.  Give us more to see.”  Sunday in the Park with George.

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James Mitchell, best known as “Palmer Cortlandt” on “All My Children” passed away on Friday, January 22, 2010 in Los Angeles, CA. In addition to his iconic role as “Palmer” on “All My Children,” (for which he received three Soap Opera Digest Awards and seven Daytime Emmy Award nominations), James had an extensive career as a dancer and choreographer in film musicals and theatre (Broadway, Off-Broadway, and Regionally). His performing career began at the American Ballet Theatre. He worked with renowned choreographer Agnes de Mills both as a dancer and choreographer in such Broadway productions as  “Bloomer Girl,” “Brigadoon” (for which he won a Theatre World Award), “Paint Your Wagon,” “Come Summer,” and in the 1955 film “Oklahoma” where he starred as “Dream Curly.” In addition to working with de Mills, James worked the acclaimed Jerome Robbins in the Broadway production of “Billion Dollar Baby.” Other Broadway and Off-Broadway credits include “Carnival,” “Mack & Mabel,” “Annie Get Your Gun,” “The Three Penny Opera,” “Winkelberg,” and “Livin’ The Life.” Regionally, James was seen in productions of “The Rainmaker,” “The King and I,” and “Funny Girl.” Throughout his extensive career, James also worked as a director and choreographer for many regional theatres including The Papermill Playhouse and American Ballet Theatre. His film credits include “The Turning Point” and “The Bandwagon.”

Rest in Peace James and Thank You for entertaining me!

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