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Posts Tagged ‘“Deadline”’

I had the privilege of sitting down with Chip Zien on October 16, 2010 after seeing his show “The History of War” in NYMF, which also starred fellow “Adaumbelle’s Quest” participant Max Von Essen. My first introduction to Chip was watching him on “All My Children” when he played gossip reporter “Donald Steele,” and from that moment on I was hooked. I then got to meet Chip after seeing him in the Broadway production of “The Boys From Syracuse” in 2002. He was so nice and now to have the opportunity to sit down with him personally for an interview with “Adaumbelle’s Quest” is a real honor!

Chip Zien is an award winning actor who has delighted audiences worldwide in theatre, film, and television! Chip created the roles “The Baker” in Stephen Sondheim/James Lapine’s “Into The Woods” as well as the role of “Mendel” in William Finn’s “Falsettos.” His many other Broadway credits include “In Trousers,” “March of the Falsettos,” “Falsettoland,” “The Country Girl,” the revival of “Les Miserables,” “Grand Hotel,” “The Boys From Syracuse,” “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang,” “All Over Town,” and “The Suicide.” Off-Broadway and regionally, Chip has entertained audiences in “Merrily We Roll Along” (L.A. Drama-Logue Award), “Anonymous,” “An Imaginary Life,” “Isn’t It Romantic” (Drama Desk Nomination), “Split,” “Moonchildren,” “Hot L Baltimore,” “Kaddish,” “A New Brain” (Drama Desk Nomination), “Diamonds,” “Real Life Funnies,” and “Tuscaloosa’s Calling Me.”

Chip has also written several shows for the stage. His one-man show “Death in Ashtabula,” “Travels With My Discontent” (a new musical written with Deborah Abramson, et al), and most recently “The History of War” which was presented at NYMF this past fall.

When not on stage or sometimes at the same time, Chip has been a fixture on television. In addition to being the announcer on “The Caroline Rhea Show,” Chip has appeared in numerous television shows such as “Lipstick Jungle,” “Rescue Me,” “CSI,” “Law and Order,” “Cheers,” “The Bob Newhart Show,” “Thirty-Something,” “Judging Amy,” “Cosby,” “The Cagney and Lacey Movies,” “Chips”, “Son of the Beach,” “Madigan Men,” “Wings,” “All My Children,” “Almost Perfect,” “Now and Again,” “Deadline,” “Shell Game,” “Love, Sidney,” “Reggie.”

Chip has also lit up the big screen in “The Siege,” “Howard The Duck” (the voice of Howard), “United 93,” “Snake Eyes,” “Breakfast of Champions,” “Dorothy Parker and the Vicious Circle,” “Grace Quigley,” “So Fine,” “Hello Again,” “House of God,” “and “The Rose.”

Currently, Chip is reworking “The History of War” for future production. Stay tuned to “Adaumbelle’s Quest” to find out when that will be!

1. Who inspired you to become a performer? Dean Martin, Frank Sinatra, and Perry Como. I always thought I’d grow up to be like Frank Sinatra, I thought Dean Martin was the greatest actor I’d ever seen, and I wanted to host a variety show like Perry Como. When I first came to NY, it was really my goal to just sing and host a variety show. Danny Kaye was a big influence on me as well…his songs were the first ones I really learned.

2. Who’s the one person you haven’t worked with that you would like to? Geoffrey Rush. I would have liked to work with Sinatra. You know early on in my career, I was very friendly with Henry Winkler and I was very jealous of Henry because he got to meet Sinatra and I never did. Of course, I would have also loved to work with Jack Lemon and Walter Matthau. I’ve said “Hi” to Angela Lansbury, but never worked with her, though I would love to. I’d like to work with all these wonderful actors in my show (“The History Of War”).

3. If you couldn’t be doing what you are doing now, what career would you choose? I was motoring down two paths when I graduated college…one was to be a lawyer and one was performing. I grew up in Milwaukee and as much as you could have a stage mother in Milwaukee, mine was one. She would enter me in these tiny tot talent shows and I would always sing in them. I’d sing “Down Yonder Someone Beckons To Me” and be dressed up like a cowboy with six shooters and a cowboy hat and at the end of the song I would pull my guns out and shoot off caps. So, I was always singing and be in shows, but performing seemed like an odd thing to do as a profession. A lot of my family were lawyers, so my real plan was to go to college, be a history major, go to law school and then be a lawyer or work on a political campaign. I actually ran a guy’s campaign my first year out of college and he lost by 1/2 a percentage point and if he had won, I would have gone to Georgetown Law School at night and work on his staff during the day and then my life would have changed. The reason I ended up acting, not only because I had been doing it my whole life through college, but because my step-sister was running a theatre in Chicago and somebody got sick, this was right after that campaign ended and I had to wait until January to start law school, so my sister said why don’t you come down here and you could play “Little Chap” in “Stop The World.” We are doing these three shows in this repertory theater and after a few months there the theatre burned to the ground, so a bunch of us got in a car and drove to New York and I got work right away in “You’re A Good Man Charlie Brown.” The rest as they say is history.

4. What’s your most embarrassing on-stage moment? I’ve had a few…but one of the worst was when I was doing “Grand Hotel” and I took over for Michael Jeter, who was fantastic. My wife was a dancer in the NYC Ballet and now she teaches at the School of American Ballet and she said to me, you know when you kick your leg up to do those big fan kicks, you’re leg is just not going anywhere. She said what really makes it terrible is that you keep looking at it. So don’t look at your leg, look up instead. I was determined to be a better dancer, so when I went on stage that night I looked up and fell backwards on my head (like doing a back flip) and everyone on stage just gasped. The first thought I had was I hope that I’m still standing, and that everyone else had fallen and turned upside down, so I was momentarily convinced that I was okay and the rest of the cast had fallen. Eventually the cast was hysterical laughing and dancing around me. Another time in “Into The Woods,” the fog machines wouldn’t turn off. The stage became so filled up that we couldn’t see anything and we all had to grope our ways out of the stage door onto 45th Street. We stood on the street hysterically laughing. The orchestra was stuck in the pit, the actors are out on the street, and the audience was trying to get out. Oh that night was a complete disaster. I’ve had a bunch of them…

5. What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? It was actually from James Lapine who said to me: “Stay focused on what you are doing. Just do your job. Don’t project too far ahead. Try not worry.” It’s the old cliche of “Staying in the moment.” My mom told me years ago when I was at camp, which I think she heard someone had said to James Cagney (I played all the great female roles in summer camp shows, I was “Lola” in “Damn Yankees,” I was “Liza Doolittle” in “My Fair Lady”), “You know you’re wandering all over the place. Stand still until you have a reason to move.” Wynn Handman, a great acting teacher in New York once said to me “Go to LA and make lots of money, then come back here and I’ll fix you.”

6. What’s your proudest moment? The birth of my children is probably the most amazing thing that’s ever happened to me. I also have to say driving by the Martin-Beck Theatre (now the Hirschfeld) when the big boot from “Into The Woods” went up on the marquee. I stood on the corner with Joanna Gleason and I never thought this would happen to me. We stood there together and thought “Wow, this was awesome.” It was this realization that something I wanted to do my whole life had happened and it happened at a very high level which I probably would have never imagined. One of the really cool things was when we taped that show for “Great Performances,” I had a moment with Sondheim after it was over, and we had a really great audience that night. It was one of those audiences who knew every line in the show and Sondheim said to me, “This is as good as it can get” and I just started to cry.

7. Do you have any strange or unusual talent that nobody knows about? Not really, but I think the one thing that is different is that I build my own computers. I’m technically pretty sophisticated. I was president of my high school AV squad and I mean old school when you had to thread the 16mm film. As the years have gone by, I was thinking, the things that interested me when I was 12 are the same things that interest me today. I’m also really good at Photoshop…I think it’s the 8th wonder of the world. It’s amazing what you can do. I’m also an excellent Yo-Yoist. I can do really complicated Yo-Yo tricks and that is because there was a Yo-Yo champion in “Grand Hotel” who used to practice back stage.

8. Favorite play/musical? My favorite musical is “Sweeney Todd.” My favorite play I’m stumped on, but I would have to say “Death of a Salesman.” I would love to do that show. I’m old enough to do it. I know they are doing it again, but it’s not with me. Me: Well that’s a mistake. Chip: I also love “Waiting for Godot.” The army scenes in this show are kind of modeled after “Waiting for Godot” at least in my head.

9. Favorite website? I’m a political junkie. I would say The Huffington Post, Talking Points Memo, and I sneak onto some of the theatrical websites.

10. Mary or Rhoda? Mary.

BONUS QUESTIONS:

11. If you could dream about anyone while you sleep, who would it be? I used to have a recurring dream where I would drink coffee around a camp fire with John Wayne and he would say “Kid, it’s gonna be okay.” Then that dream mutated to Jack Gilford as I got older. It’s kind of really funny because they are opposite ends of the spectrum. I crossed paths with John Wayne at one moment in my career because at one point we had the same agent, obviously it was late in his career and early in mine, and I was sitting in a lobby across from John Wayne and I thought to myself “Wow, this is really the yin and yang of show business right here.” I said, “Hi” and he said, “Hi, how are you doing kid?”

I would also love to dream about having dinner with Bill and Hillary or President Obama. I liked to dream about being at some of those big meetings they have, like health care. Those dreams can be exciting because you can’t be at them in real life.

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Photo credit: Stephen Mosher

Whether he’s in front of the camera acting or behind the scenes as a film maker, Michael Stever, is making art for all to see. Michael has worked with some of the biggest names in entertainment. As an actor Michael has performed in both theatre and television in such shows as “Super Force,” “Deadline,” and “Arsenic and Old Lace” starring the legendary Betty Garrett. He has filmed Debbie Reynolds induction into The Friars Club, Mary Bond Davis in her “The Next Food Network Star” video, Judy McLane at the Laurie Beechman theatre, musical virtuoso Janice Martin, various events for The Screen Actor Guild’s BookPals group, Barnes and Noble, and Playbill magazine columist Ellis Nassour. He also filmed and lent his voice to Broadway Impact’s “Defying Inequality” Broadway concert where he interviewed such performers as Lynda Carter, Gavin Creel, Jonathan Groff, and Tamara Tunie. He was the Unit Production Manager on the critically acclaimed documentary “Broadway: The Golden Age” while his short film “Ghosts of Zion & Michael Nyman” was featured on the Indie film website “Shooting People.” Michael also shot and edited the Actors Fund benefit reading of “Valley of the Dolls” as well as ABLE Rigging Contractors’ brand new website. He is the official camera man for “The Brini Maxwell Show” podcasts and most recently he completed filming and editing the new commercial for Boy Butter Personal Lubricant starring drag superstar and fellow “Adaumbelle’s Quest” participant Hedda Lettuce. Finally, in what will be his first independently produced short film, Stever is producing “Saturday Nightmares; The Ultimate Horror Expo of All Time!” No ordinary Horror Expo, this unprecedented event brings together the entire George A Romero family! Also features Adrienne Barbeau, Tom Savini, Roy Fumkes, Ken Foree, John Amplas, Joe Pilato & many more.  Coming soon to Amazon.com. For much more on Michael and all of his projects be sure to visit: http://www.michaelstever.net.

1. Who inspired you to be both an actor and a film maker? That’s a hard question, but as a filmmaker, I would say “King Kong” and Fay Wray were my first muses in that sense. I started playing with my mom and dad’s 16mm video camera from the time I was 7 or 8 years old and was a big fan of “King Kong” and Fay Wray and I basically wanted to re-create King Kong.  All I had at my disposal was a “Planet of the Apes” doll which I used as my King Kong then stuck him on this round plastic garbage can, and got a plane and put that on a string and that was my King Kong, it was very simple. As an actor I would have to say Jessica Lange. I was a big fan of the 1976 remake of “King Kong” which she was in, but the movie itself got ripped to shreds and she didn’t get a lot of respect for it, but she worked really hard and gravitated to really challenging things as an actor and she got an Oscar nomination for her role as “Frances Farmer” in “Frances.” To me that was pretty great.

2. Who is the one person you haven’t worked with that you would like to? I’d love to work with the amazing Jan Broberg who I worked with years ago. She has had some great opportunity’s as an actor, specifically in the WB series Ever wood. Jan also published a book a couple years ago called Stolen Innocencewhich chronicles her kidnapping when she was 12 years old at the hands of a trusted family friend. We have discussed shooting a documentary together that centers around her and her ordeal, but nothing is finalized on that, though she was recently in Los Angeles to see if Lifetime would produce her story into a film, which is pretty exciting. I’d also love to work with Margot Kidder, who I’m a big fan of and Angelica Torn (the daughter of Geraldine Page and Rip Torn). Angelica’s been out on tour with “August: Osage County.” She’s brilliant. She is also the person who murders the little girl in “Sixth Sense.” Would love, love, love to work with her.

3. What’s your proudest moment both as an actor and as a filmmaker? As an actor that would definitely be “Arsenic and Old Lace” with Betty Garrett and Carole Cook. It was one my first straight plays I did and Betty Garrett is a legend. My other proudest moment is when I made my TV debut in a sci-fi series called “Super Force” and I had a fight scene with Traci Lords, which afterward I became a big fan of hers.

4. What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? “To do your homework” and “Try not to project expectations onto other people.”

5. If you could dream about anyone while you sleep, who would it be? I can tell you who I have dreamt about. I actually had the fortunate experience of meeting Fay Wray, who of course was the original star of “King Kong” who was also a silent film icon. I kind of had a thing for Fay Wray as a kid and I never thought I’d actually meet her, but fate intervened and I got to meet her when I was working on “Broadway The Golden Age” and I learned we had so many things in common. When Fay passed away, I finally read her autobiography learned there were more things we had in common. I had this vivid dream about us, but I really think she was a muse and guiding force for me on many levels.

6. Starbucks or Dunkin’ Donuts? What do you order? Starbucks. Their coffee is stronger. I used to do coffee all the time, but now I do espresso. I get 2 shots of espresso, with a pump of cherry syrup and chocolate.

7. Favorite way to stay in shape? Since I’ve been editing, that’s been really difficult, but over the past few years, my favorite way to stay in shape has been yoga and bike riding.

8. Boxers or Briefs? Both…it depends on what I have.

9. Favorite website? Youtube and Rottentomatoes.com.

10. Superman or Wonder Woman? Both, with a lean to Wonder Woman, though I do think the original “Superman” movie is one of the best movies ever made. The scene where “Lois Lane” crashes into the Daily Planet in the helicopter, I think is probably next to King Kong my favorite scene in all of movie history.

BONUS QUESTIONS:

11. Favorite TV Show Theme Song? There’s been so many. I was one of those kids who wanted to capture everything from the television so I would just stick my parents tape recorder up to the television and record things.

12. Favorite way to spend your day off? I love to watch movies, take yoga, or ride my bike.

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